Persuasive Writing — Simple Tips to Make Your Writing More Persuasive

Want to make your writing more persuasive?  Taking a few final steps after drafting your persuasive writing will make a big difference in how effective it is. Apply these simple tips to make your writing more persuasive – whether you are writing a brochure, website copy, a speech or an email.

  1. http://www.bristolassoc.com/?chiko=%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AE%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%B1%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AB%D9%86%D8%A7%D8%A6%D9%8A%D8%A9-%D9%86%D8%B8%D8%A7%D9%85-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AA%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%84-%D8%AA%D8%AD%D9%85%D9%8A%D9%84&eb1=24 Persuasive writing is simple and easy to understand.

Using complicated words, technical jargon and corporate buzzwords will make your persuasive writing more difficult to read. As a result, fewer people will want to read what you have written and those who do read it might not be able to understand it. In order to make your persuasive writing more effective, start by using the simplest words possible, remove technical jargon, if your target readers won’t understand it, and get rid of corporate buzzwords. For more details, read our post on Using Simple Words.

  1. http://hollmen.com/?kastrylja=%D8%A3%D8%B1%D8%A8%D8%AD-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A7%D9%85%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%84-%D8%A8%D8%B3%D8%B1%D8%B9%D8%A9-%D8%A8%D8%B7%D8%B1%D9%82-%D8%BA%D9%8A%D8%B1-%D9%82%D8%A7%D9%86%D9%88%D9%86%D9%8A%D8%A9&1f2=e1 Persuasive writing contains short and simple sentences.

Research shows that long and complicated sentences are more difficult to read and understand. If your persuasive writing includes many sentences longer than 35 words, edit them to make them shorter. An effective way to begin shortening your sentences is to look for conjunctions — such as ‘and’, ‘but’, ‘however’, ‘yet’ and ‘so’. Often, a good point to break up a sentence in your persuasive writing to make it smaller is when you use a conjunction. For more information and examples, go to Copywriting Basics – Aim for a Short Average Sentence Length. 

  1. مجهول Persuasive writing focuses on your readers.

Persuasive writing involves getting your readers involved, so ‘speak’ to them directly by using the word ‘you’. Let’s look at the following two contrasting examples:

We ensure توصيات الاسهم السعودية vip our clients get the most competitive carrier costs along with cutting-edge service levels. As Australia’s first wholly integrated carrier management service, Freightworks gets المكافآت our clients’ freight delivered better, faster and cheaper.

We ensure http://hookuptackle.com.au/?kowch=%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AE%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%B1%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AB%D9%86%D8%A7%D8%A6%D9%8A%D8%A9-%D9%85%D8%B9-%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%AE%D8%B7%D8%B7%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B4%D9%85%D8%B9%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%86&d9f=4c you get the most competitive carrier costs along with cutting-edge service levels. As Australia’s first wholly integrated carrier management service, Freightworks gets http://woldswaylavender.co.uk/?antaliiste=%D9%83%D8%A7%D8%B1%D8%A7-kerja-%D8%AB%D9%86%D8%A7%D8%A6%D9%8A-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AE%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%B1-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B1%D9%88%D8%A8%D9%88%D8%AA&416=a1 your freight delivered better, faster and cheaper.

Changing ‘our clients’ to ‘you’ and ‘your’ addresses the reader directly and makes your writing more persuasive. To learn more about customer-focused copy, go to What Many Advertising Agencies Don’t Know about Copywriting.

This persuasive writing tip applies to websites, brochures and other formats that directly address your readers.  However, it would not apply to writing proposals, reports or other formal business documents.

  1. الخيارات الثنائية zerodha Persuasive writing is free from grammatical and typographical errors.

A key element of persuasive writing is building trust and credibility. It’s a simple fact that spelling mistakes and grammatical errors will lower your image in the eyes of your readers. As a result, your writing won’t be a persuasive. For example, UK entrepreneur Charles Duncomb found that his online sales per site visitor doubled after correcting spelling mistakes. His experience was published in a BBC article.

Similarly, other research showed that 59% of online shoppers said they would not purchase from a website with poor spelling and grammar.

Regardless of the type of business you are in, persuasive writing can play an important role in building your credibility and making more sales. By following the simple steps outlined in this article, you can boost the effectiveness of your writing.

Michael Gladkoff

Writing an Event Promotion that Gets Results

Are you organising a business event and want to get as many people to attend it as possible? Writing an effective event promotion is the key to filling the room to make the event a success. Here are a few tips to make the event promotion – whether it takes the form of an email or hard copy – an effective marketing tool to get more event bookings.

Shows a speaker at the front of an audience. Event promotion is an important part of organising a successful event.

1. http://www.chestnuthorsefeeds.co.uk/?pole=%D8%A3%D8%B1%D8%A8%D8%AD-%D8%A3%D9%85%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%84-%D8%B9%D9%84%D9%89-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A5%D9%86%D8%AA%D8%B1%D9%86%D8%AA-%D9%85%D8%AC%D8%A7%D9%86%D8%A7 Start by writing an enticing headline for your event promotion.

Most business events will have one or more speakers covering a topic or related topics. Start with a headline that captures attention and addresses a challenge that your target audience can identify with. For example, if your event is about sales, your title might be Discover Keys to Boosting Your Sales with Less Stress or How to Increase Your Sales by 50% Without Working More.

For an event where I spoke about speech writing, the promotional headline included the questions: 

Are your speeches and presentations interesting and memorable?

Do you feel frustrated or anxious when you need to prepare a speech?

2. انظر هذا هنا After the headline, write a general background about the challenges surrounding the topic.

The background can include questions and comments about the subject matter that gets readers thinking about the challenges they are facing.

For example, one event that focused on the future of an industry had the following copy:

Do you know which major trends will affect your business in the next few years? Do you have a strategy to deal with them? How can you possibly plan without knowing all the driving forces that are changing your industry?

For one of my presentations on speech writing, I included the following background information after the headline:

The 2008 US Presidential Election showed us that public speaking is an important way to motivate, persuade and inspire people. Too often, business speeches are not interesting or memorable. In The Art of the Great Speech you will learn simple techniques that will make it easier for you to create and deliver outstanding speeches.

For another event that focused on retail business in Australia, the background included:

Australia’s retail landscape has changed dramatically in recent years. Online shopping, consumer expectations of discounting, workplace relations, consumer confidence and a range of other factors have created challenges and opportunities in the industry. Is your retail business keeping up with the rapid pace of change?

These introductions after the headlines provide a topic overview and bring up the challenges that are addressed during the event.

انظر هنا 3. The benefits section shows the readers what they will get out of the presentation to improve an aspect of their business or career.

One technique that has worked well is expressing the benefits in bullet point form. Writing an event promotion this way makes the benefits stand out for readers who skim the copy.

Here is an example from an event promotion aimed at professional speakers:

In this information-packed event, Tom Jenkins — one of the Australia’s top professional speakers — will show you what’s required to create and maintain a successful speaking business.

Tom will share his insights, tools and systems that are essential for success in professional speaking.

During the lunch session, you will learn how to:

  • Plan your business to maximise your results
  • Find more clients
  • Get a steady flow of speaking engagements coming in
  • Contact buyers and audience members for additional business following conferences.

When promoting my speech writing presentation, I outlined the benefits as follows:

In this session you will discover how to:

  • Create a memorable speech in less time
  • Take the frustration and confusion out of preparing a speech
  • Employ ancient techniques, often used by business and political leaders, to influence your listeners and make a lasting impression
  • Open and conclude your speech with maximum impact.

In the introductory phrase and the bullet point items, try to use “you” as much as possible, without overdoing it, to speak directly to your readers.

المصدر الرسمي 4. Write your call to action. This is what you want the readers to do next.

For example:

Interest will be high and seats are limited, so please RSVP by Wednesday 28 April on to 0403 857 273 or email success@bestevents.com  to reserve your place at this event.

 And

If you don’t have a game plan for 2015, the Speaking Business Kick-Off Lunch will help you get started on a winning year. 

Book now to reserve your place at this special event.

نشرت هنا 5. Write about the speaker to highlight their experience, knowledge and other positive attributes.  

This will help you build credibility and get the readers interested in hearing what the speaker has to say. Try to keep the speaker profile short so that the readers don’t have to wade through a lot of text to learn about the speaker.

For example:

أفضل المنتديات الخيارات الثنائية Albert Cranston, Director of Operations at NEXUS

Albert manages NEXUS’s operations, including sales and marketing, in Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia, New Zealand, and the Asia-Pacific region.

A founder of NEXUS, Albert has been an IT professional since 1997 and received a Bachelor of Commerce in Finance and IT from the University of Sydney. He is accredited by Microsoft and is a Certified Business Intelligence Professional.

Before establishing NEXUS, Albert led the Business Intelligence Team as Principal at Global Solutions Group in Melbourne and managed a team of consultants to implement a BI reporting system for the National Bank in the United Kingdom.  He was also an Associate Graduate at Datatech, where he worked with senior consultants.

Notable projects that were implemented under Albert’s guidance include a data management system for Allied International Insurance and an enterprise-wide budgeting, forecasting and reporting system for a major international bank.

One common mistake is to put the speaker profile at the beginning of the event promotion and  rely on the presenter’s bio to spark interest. This approach can work if the speaker is famous in their field. For a lesser-known speaker, however, it’s best to lead with the topic background and benefits of the presentation.

Writing an event promotion does not have to be a challenge. By following the steps outlined, you can create an effective promotion that gets results.

Website Copywriter — Why Use a Professional?

Do you really need a professional website copywriter?

You might question if you need a professional website copywriter. It’s true that most people know how to write at some level, so they think they will be able to save money by writing their own content for their website. Some business owners also believe that they are best suited to write about their business because they are closely involved with it. But a website written by a professional copywriter will be far more effective and generate more enquiries and sales than one written by an amateur.

Professional website copywriter working at his computer.

There are several reasons for this:

  1. A professional website copywriter will specialise in the persuasive aspects of writing. This includes knowing how to combine words effectively — using logic, emotion and authority — to build a strong case for the business and its products or services. It also includes knowing how to write for the web, where keeping the copy simple is vital to maintaining the interest of readers.
  2. A website copywriter will have an outside perspective and be able to see things that a person who works in the business might miss. Seeing the business from the inside and being too close to it can limit your perspective and the ability to explain the benefits of products and services to others. Writing your own copy is much like trying to cut your own hair. You might be able to do it, but you won’t be able to see whole picture and probably will end up with a poor result.

Although a professional website copywriter might not know the specifics of your business, they know how to conduct research and interviews to uncover elements that will build your credibility and sell more products and services. Also, it doesn’t matter if a website copywriter hasn’t written in your industry before. Most professional writers are flexible and know how to uncover the information that’s important, so it’s not necessary to find a copywriter who has experience in your industry.

3. For many of us, it’s been a long time since we have studied English grammar. Over the years, it’s easy to forget the subtle rules of grammar, such as when to use a comma or when to use a colon or semi-colon. A professional website copywriter works with grammar and punctuation every day and knows rules of good writing. By using a professional copywriter, you can prevent the embarrassment and loss of image that can result from bad writing on your website.

4. A professional website copywriter can save you time. An expert will be able to write your website in a fraction of the time it takes an amateur. This can be compared to doing your own mechanical work on your own car. A professional mechanic has been trained and has the equipment to get the job done quickly and efficiently, while the home mechanic can spend hours trying to put the pieces back together. In many cases, the repair that you thought would take a few hours ends up taking the whole weekend.

Similarly, using a professional website copywriter is much like using a professional photographer. While most people know how to use a camera, professional photographers know the intricacies of the craft, such as how to use lighting, equipment and technique to create superior results. Most people are aware of this and will hire a professional photographer for a wedding or other important event. Yet when it comes to writing website copy, some businesspeople try to cut corners and write it themselves — or try to find a cheap amateur to do it. Unfortunately, they end up with websites that are not as effective they could have been.

Choose your website copywriter carefully. You can find a cheap website copywriter on overseas and local service auction sites. The bad news is many of these writers are amateurs who don’t know what they’re doing or they write in their local English style that doesn’t work in Australia. When we’ve studied some of these websites, we have noticed that the profiles that these writers have created for themselves are poorly written and full of mistakes. Also, we’re often approached by business people who ask us to improve the copy written by these cheap amateur writers. Sometimes this cheap website copywriting is so bad, we have to start all over again. So when sourcing a website copywriter, the old maxim “You get what you pay for” holds true.

If you are setting up a new website or want to improve an existing one, we’ll be glad to discuss your website copywriting needs and provide a quotation.

Michael Gladkoff

Five Steps to Writing and Designing a Great Brochure

All businesses need a brochure of some form to promote products or services.  It’s important that this brochure hits the mark in its message. In order to ensure your message is the right one for your target audience, you first need to identify what your mark is.

First, follow the AIDA model, when creating any marketing material, including your brochure.

  • forex kontor i malmö Attention – Grab their attention on the first page/section. These pictures and words should be about the problem the customer wants to solve or the outcome they are seeking so that you immediately build rapport with them.
  • خذ المزيد Interest – The next page/section should build the audience’s interest in how you can help them achieve the results they desire.
  • الاستثمار فى الذهب Desire – In this section include why your product or service is the best they can buy and the reasons it is. Make sure you use words and language they would use and relate to.
  • كيفية فتح حساب تداول الذهب Action – Finish with a “Call to Action” – What do you want them to do next? Tell them what to do and make it easy for them to do it. For example, look up your website, call your sales office or the go to the retail stores. Choose your words and the call to action at the end to meet your objective for the brochure.

With the AIDA model in mind, you can follow these 5 steps in designing and writing for a great brochure.

1. Using the strategic choices described in the previous blog post (see Writing a Brochure That Sells Your Products and Services), list the key points for your audience. Set it out in the order they will want to look at it. What are the main categories of information or aspects of your product or service that they want to know about?

This will set out the outline and structure of your brochure and the main headings or sections of information.

2. Select high quality photographs, pictures or graphs for your brochure that best represent what the target customer wants to see. Ensure they:

  • Set the style and the scene for the positioning
  • Show the product in the best possible usage or illustrate the service or image of it
  • Create the image of the outcomes the target customer is seeking

People are attracted to colour and pictures more than words. Use as many relevant images as you can. Make sure you have permission to use them.

3. Write your brochure copy or content in the language of your audience.

Use questions to encourage your audience to think about what they want. Questions also help build rapport with your audience. After you have written it, go through and remove all the extra words you can. Aim to keep the amount of words to a minimum. It is best to get a professional copywriter to write this for you.

4. Put your brochure together with the content and the photos.

Choose the size and format that suits the content and your objective. Use a graphic designer to layout the brochure for a very professional finish. Otherwise there are many templates available on the internet to help make it look the best you can. It might be a postcard, an A4 sheet, a two-sided tri-fold DL or a booklet, depending on how much information you want to include and how much you want to spend on the printing.

5. Print your brochure on the optimum paper for your design and budget.

If you follow these steps, you will have an amazing brochure that will attract your customer and hit the mark in motivating them to buy your product or service. Make it fun as you go through this process as that will come out in your brochure and people will want to read it more.

Writing a Brochure That Sells Your Products and Services

Handsome man with pipe writing a brochure at his typewriter.

Your brochure can be one of the most effective tools in your marketing tool kit. So before writing a brochure it’s critical to make strategic choices about what you put in it so that it differentiates your products or services for your market and against your competition.

The most important criteria when writing a brochure  is that it says what your target market wants to know, rather than all you want to tell them about how great you are. So you need to understand “What is the information your target customers want to know so they can make a decision?”

The following are the strategic choices you need to make before writing a brochure:

1.  Who is your target customer?

  • What outcomes are the seeking?
  • What problems do they want to solve that you can help with?
  • What is important to them?
  • What do they need to know to make a decision?

Really understanding your customer helps to write a brochure that is specific and targeted, rather than full of generalisations, and that will peak your audience’s interest. Ask your current customers and potential customers to get some feedback before you begin writing your brochure.

2. Who is your actual audience?

  • Who will read the brochure?
  • Who exactly will buy your product or service?
  • What is their role in the family or business?
  • What influences them?

This will help you with writing the brochure content that best suits your audience and provides what they need to know to make a decision. If you are selling to a business, you need to identify the decision maker and target them as your audience.

3. What is your objective in writing a brochure? What do you want it to do?

  • Educate the audience about the need for such a product or service?
  • Make them aware that your product/service exists so they want to find out more?
  • Give them information about your products or services as part of your service delivery?
  • Sell your product through the brochure?

The different objectives will change the writing and style of your brochure.

4.  Choose your positioning for your product or service. What makes it stand out from the crowd and what will you focus on when writing your brochure?

Is it:

  • High class, top of the range, high price?
  • The lowest price available on the market?
  • The best value-added services package?
  • The most number of options available?
  • Or many other options?

Choose what’s right for you.

The quality and focus of your brochure needs to illustrate your positioning. For example, high-class, top-of-the-range product needs a high-class, top-of-the-range brochure.

5. How do you stand out from the crowd when writing a brochure? Know your competition.

Questions you will want to ask when writing a brochure are:

  • How are your products or services better than those offered by your competition?
  • What do you offer that’s unique to you?
  • How does that match up with the outcomes your audience wants and what is important to them?

This is a critical step in identifying your core message before writing your brochure content. Align what your stand-out qualities with your target market research from Steps 1 and 2.

6. What is your budget for your brochure? Does it match your positioning and meet your objective?

Your budget will determine the layout and quality of your brochure. It will also determine your next steps.

Now all you have to do is start writing your brochure content — or get a professional copywriter to do the writing for you. This is followed by designing the layout and getting the brochure printed. The second blog in this series will help you do that.

These steps are a great process to go through every time you are writing any marketing content for your product or service. They’re based on a simple premise: the better you know your customers, the better you can serve them.

For Part 2 of this post, go to Writing and Designing a Great Brochure.

 

Copywriting — What Makes Copywriting Robotic?

What do we mean by robotic copywriting?  Simply put, robotic copywriting is not conversational and not customer focused, while it’s unnecessarily formal and complicated.

Here are four warning signs of robotic copywriting.

Shows a copywriting robot on computer outdoors in a field with grass and flowers. The message of the post is to avoid robotic copywriting.

1. Robotic copywriting doesn’t use personal pronouns.

One of the first signs of robotic copywriting is repetition of the company name. If you skim the text of many annual reports, for example, you will see the company name constantly repeated.  Maybe the copywriter thought it wasn’t appropriate to use ‘we’, ‘us’ or ‘our’ when referring to the company. But a key to effective copywriting is creating a conversational tone that includes personal pronouns.

Here’s a sample of how this was done in the Siemens 2006 Annual Report.

People Excellence: We’ve established a high-performance culture throughout our company. Based on clear performance goals, this culture enables our people to realize their full potential. To increase our global talent pool, we’re fostering talented young people worldwide. We’ve created new career tracks for experts and redesigned our management development program.

You will notice the copywriter used we and our instead of repeating the company name. In addition, the copywriter used contractions — we’ve and we’re — to give the copy a conversational feel.

Another way to avoid robotic copywriting is by being direct and using the word that’s most important to your readers — you.  The following examples show how much difference one word can make.

Before

  • Our clients get a full spectrum of advertising related services.
  • Our clients get common sense advice that helps them grow their businesses.
  • Our clients receive strategic and creative leadership across a full array of marketing communications.

After

  • You get a full spectrum of advertising related services.
  • You get common sense advice that helps you grow your business.
  • You receive strategic and creative leadership across a full array of marketing communications.

One of the first rules in selling is to assume the sale. Writing our clients does not assume the sale but writing you does.

2. Robotic copywriting is focused on the product or company, not benefits to the customer.

In The Copywriter’s Handbook, Robert Bly provides excellent examples that show the difference between copywriting that focuses on the needs customers and copywriting that focuses on the company or product.

Product-focused copywriting: ‘BankPlan is the state-of-the-art in user-friendly, sophisticated financial software for small business accounts receivable, accounts payable, and general ledger applications.’

Customer-focused copywriting: ‘BankPlan helps you balance your books and manage your cash flow. It also keeps track of customers who haven’t paid their bills. Best of all, the program is easy to use — you don’t need special training.’

So focus on your customers and their needs to avoid robotic copywriting.

3. Robotic copywriting uses big words and more words than are needed to convey the message.

Robotic copywriting also tends to use big words when simpler equivalents will work. For example, ‘Utilising our new software will facilitate an optimal outcome’ can be changed to ‘Using our new software will help you create the best outcome.’

Examples of large words and phrases that can be reduced include:

  • accomplish → do
  • ascertain → find out
  • disseminate → send out, distribute
  • employ → use
  • endeavour → try
  • expedite → hasten, speed up
  • facilitate → make easier, help
  • facility → building, warehouse, etc.
  • locality → place
  • however → but
  • therefore → so.

4. Robotic copywriting uses jargon and corporate buzzwords.

Many of these overused words are vague and have lost any meaning. They often can be expressed in a better way.

Some examples include:

  • Best practice
  • Core competencies
  • Deliverables
  • Driver
  • Incentivise
  • Learnings
  • Mission-critical
  • Operationalise
  • Paradigm shift
  • Value proposition.

Do these types of terms have a clear meaning when used in copywriting to promote a company’s product or services? Usually not. For a humorous look at business buzzwords, go to the Corporate BS Generator.

If you write or edit copy, keep these four points in mind to avoid robotic copywriting.

 

 

 

Writing a Capability Statement to Win More Business

Having a capability statement is becoming increasingly important, especially if your business is seeking to win government contracts. But what is a capability statement? Some writers describe it as a resume for your business — others call it a marketing document. In reality, a capability statement (sometimes called a capabilities statement) is a bit of both.

A capability statement is a document that tells readers who you are and what you can do for them. Common elements of capability statements can include a summary of your business, your core competencies, past performance, important projects and key differentiators that set you apart. Shorter is better, so we recommend keeping it under 5 pages.

Some of the points you might include when writing a capability statement are:

  • Business summary – a few paragraphs on who you are and what you do. This can include a brief history of your business.
  • Your capabilities — this is the core of a capability statement. Be sure to highlight what makes you stand out from other businesses. Begin with an introductory statement and list your capabilities in bullet point form so they stand out and are easy to read.
  • Projects and clients – when writing your capability statement, list your clients (if not confidential) and the important projects you have completed. If space permits, briefly describe project goals and how these were achieved. Be sure to include projects that are relevant to the work you are trying to win with the capability statement. It might be best to customise your capability statement to fit the requirements of each potential client.
  • Credentials and accreditation – these will be more important in professional service industries. Be sure to include awards your business has received for excellence in delivering its services.
  • Insurance, policies and procedures  – these can include the types of insurance held and levels of coverage, and risk management policies and procedures such as occupational health and safety.
  • Your company data – clearly include your contact information at the end of the capability statement so you can be reached easily. Other information can include your ABN, ACN, DUNS or other identification numbers.

Writing a capability statement does not have to be a difficult exercise. If you spend some time thinking about your business and gather the relevant information, you will be well on your way to writing a capability statement that will help you win more business.

Copywriting To Motivate Consumer Mindsets

Copywriting is not normally a term associated with psychology. But there is no doubt about it, copywriting is a powerful means to motivate and shape consumer mindsets. In this blog, we look at how you can leverage copywriting to activate readers’ unseen motivators. Getting them to think, buy and act upon your word.

The underlying psychology of copywriting
What really makes your consumers tick? Any copywriter who can answer this question holds the Midas touch. If you wish to profoundly influence your target market, you need to understand their psychological make-up. Only then can you pitch your copywriting in a way that resonates with their ‘hot buttons’ or hidden motivators. This is what we call ‘psychologically groomed’ copywriting. A tool that can help you:

  • ingrain brand loyalty upon your consumers’ psyche
  • break down sales resistance by appealing to reader emotions
  • understand what issues your readers face and seek to solve.

Sound good? Let’s look at how you can psychologically groom your copywriting.

It all begins with an understanding of your consumers’ decision-making process.

Emotion is your chief copywriting ally
The human brain functions on three basic levels — instinctive, emotional and rational.

Effective copywriting strategically appeals to all three.

Now, most of your customers would say that their purchasing decisions are rational. Driven by logical reasoning like: I need a new pair of shoes because my current pair have grown uncomfortable. Yet emotion primarily drives consumer decision-making. Your consumer may feel compelled to buy those new shoes because:

  • I feel embarrassed that my shoes are in last season’s style. Your consumer doesn’t want to feel out of date or fall behind the fashion flock.
  • All the other girls are wearing shoes in this new style. Theirs look much smarter than mine and I don’t want to be left out. Your consumer wants to fit in and be accepted.
  • I haven’t seen anyone else wearing this style of shoe…I could be the first. Your consumer is exhilarated at the notion of setting a new trend.

All these are examples of ‘hidden motivators’ your copywriting can play to. There are many more, like:

  • health
  • exclusivity
  • time
  • social or business advancement.

The key is to know the motivators of your particular target market, then tailor your copywriting to fit.

Use copywriting to ignite consumer instinct
Emotion arouses instinct, thus providing another powerful copywriting tool. Say you are pitching to new mothers. Their maternal love arouses an instinct to protect and nurture their baby. Or perhaps you are marketing income protection insurance to executives. Their instinct for self-preservation is aroused by fear of losing income and lifestyle.

Tap into those instincts which dominate your consumers’ action, then tailor your copywriting to fit. A great way to do this is through storytelling. Take readers on a journey where you arouse their instincts, engage emotions, then show them how much better their life will be with your product.

Roll out the rationale in copywriting
So what follows an emotional decision to act? Rational brain functioning! Your consumer employs logic to rationalise their decision. Psychologically groomed copywriting helps them in this process. Outline vividly how much better and easier life will be once they have taken the desired action.

Say you want to sell a designer handbag. Your copywriting should detail the quality of finest leather, intricate hand stitching and exquisite detailing. Outline the investment potential of the bag too. It complements any outfit, offers generous space with clever organisation. Plus with timeless style, your consumer can enjoy her bag all season and it will last her through many more.

Walk in your consumers’ shoes
Just as an actor immerses themselves into character, you must become your consumer. Psychologically groomed copywriting requires that you understand your consumer’s most heartfelt desires, needs and feelings. Then choose words that resonate with these, painting a picture of their ultimate satisfaction. This copywriting method is truly a force to be reckoned with.

Copywriting — why you should make your words visually appealing as well as persuasive

Super long sentences, tombstones of text, wallflower headlines…ugh! When it comes to copywriting, good looks matter. Copywriters sometimes neglect the aesthetics of their work. We get so caught up in what the words say that we forget the importance of how they look. But visual presentation is a hurdle your copywriting must sail over to get read at all! And this is not a job that lies solely with a graphic designer.

Truly terrific copywriting starts with the end in mind
I’m not arguing against the importance of your copy’s message here. Without a doubt, crafting compelling, persuasive and appealing content is a chief concern of every copywriter. But our content is always bound for a final destination — whether online or in print. So a graphic designer will need to take your copywriting and make it look incredible within a visual layout. Quite a tall order when you’re delivering a solid slab of unbroken content. As a copywriter then, you need to keep in mind the medium your content is bound for. Break up your content into easily definable ‘bite-sized’ chunks. Draw out strong word elements to highlight key messages. These are just some things you can do at the copywriting stage. There’s plenty more.

I’ll be sharing some easy and effective ways for achieving aesthetically pleasing content in this blog. So you can instantly put greater visual appeal to work in your copy.

But first, let’s take a look at why good looking copywriting is so important.

It’s not just about making graphic design easier. It’s about doing justice to your copywriting and making this even better! Visual presentation can:

  • help your copywriting appeal to your audience
  • support your content in achieving its purpose
  • make it easier to navigate your copywriting
  • guide your reader to better follow and understand your copywriting
  • unfold your copywriting like a story to improve persuasiveness
  • logically lay out key detail and information
  • capture and convert time-poor readers at a glance.

Visually effective copywriting encompasses varied pace and different presentation tools

Here are some great techniques you can use.

Include a headline
Here it is…the first line of copy that your reader will see. So you should seldom write copy without a headline. A headline makes your pitch for you right up front. It hooks the readers’ attention and determines whether they see benefit in reading on. If you are a copywriter, you’re concerned with crafting a powerful punchy headline — as you should be. But you should also use visual savvy to boost headline impact by:

  • setting your headline clearly apart from the rest of your copy
  • making your headline 10 words maximum as a general rule
  • setting your headline in a larger font than the body text
  • using a different coloured font…but don’t get too funky
  • leaving a little white space between your heading and body copy.

Soup up the subheadings
Subheadings are vastly underused but make a valuable tool for any aesthetically-minded copywriter. They visually break up paragraphs, group information and clearly drive home key ideas. Plus subheads work in tandem with your headline. Telling a compelling ‘at a glance’ story to time-poor readers. Tricks to using subheadings include:

  • keeping the message simple — a clear summary of the following paragraph in a few words
  • having one idea per subheading — so readers can pick and choose information of interest
  • getting action-oriented — using your final subhead as a call to action to convert your readers.

The silver bullet for visually appealing copywriting
Nothing turns a reader off more quickly than great swathes of unbroken content — especially for today’s readers who like to scan. So bullet point lists are a great way to make your copy visually easy to comprehend and succinctly emphasise important info. These are perfect for time-poor readers with short attention spans.

But bullet points can be a double-edged sword. You should use them judiciously. Avoid lengthy bulleted lists — 6 or 7 bullets per list are generally the most you want without overdoing it.

Pull out the pull quotes
A pull quote is a short extract from your copy strategically positioned on the page. Pull quotes are a terrific way to highlight your key ideas. They break up your copy in a visually striking way too. Set your pull quote in a larger font size to create greater visual priority.

Short is sweet for paragraph length
Keep your paragraphs and sentences short in your copywriting! Succinct paragraphs are heaven to modern readers’ eyes. They are easier to digest, take little work to read and look better too. The same goes for sentence length. Aim to keep your average sentence length under 20 words. (You can find the average sentence length in Word, as we explained in a previous post at www.wordnerds.com.au/2009/02/copywriting-basics-aim-for-a-short-average-sentence-length/)

 

Finally…easy on the font
Don’t extend your creative flair to font choice. A common font will pack a much bigger punch than Wingdings or the like. Stick to one font throughout your copy too. You can select a font family to differentiate headings and subheadings. If you do want to mix it up a little, have no more than three different fonts in one piece of copy.

Remember: consistency is the key to visually appealing copy. So be consistent with typefaces and headline sizes for headlines, subheadings and body copy.

So the next time you need to do some copywriting, infuse visual appeal into it. Your readers and clients will love you for it.

 

Storytelling for Copywriting That Delivers

Storytelling has the ability to capture attentions and deliver messages in indirect ways.

I recently read the most riveting book in a single day. I’d meant to sneak in a chapter here and there for a bit of R&R. But a few pages in and I couldn’t put it down. Once I’d finished the book I felt a real loss — what was I going to do with myself now? What I did was head right out to buy the second and third instalment in the trilogy! Hurrying off to the bookstore, I just couldn’t believe how emotionally invested I’d become in the characters and plot. So I started thinking about how such skilfully woven storytelling could translate into copywriting.

My actions were exactly those which I want my copywriting to inspire in others. I was a captive audience, instant convert and my interest translated into a sale. What’s more, I’ll always keep an eye out for new books by that same author now.

So in this copywriting blog post, we’ll discuss why storytelling can have profound impact on your copywriting. Then we’ll look at how to ensure this impact is positive.

But first, why is storytelling such a powerful copywriting tool?

I’ll give you three great reasons.

Ignited imagination makes for powerful persuasion
Get your consumer emotionally connected with your copy and you’ve hit a home run. Whatever action you want people to take, you need to invoke feeling behind this. When people feel sympathy they are moved to make charitable donations. When people feel empowered they want the product that instigates this sensation. So put storytelling to work in your copy and you’ll stir feelings that persuade readers to buy what you’re selling because storytelling makes your copy more meaningful.

Storytelling is the art of subliminal selling
A carefully crafted plot takes your readers on a journey. Each stage of that journey is signposted: need, solution, even fresh possibilities. But often your readers don’t notice what they’re absorbing along the way. A great story will leave your concept, purpose and desired action firmly implanted in your readers’ minds. In the end they may not know why they must act — they simply feel they must. In essence, storytelling when copywriting sells to the subconscious.

Storytelling in copywriting is all about the feel-good feeling
We’re surrounded by stories in our everyday life. Movies, books, even the exchange of news with our friends. Stories feel very natural to people – even reassuring. Herein lies the power of storytelling through copywriting. When your audience feels comfortable they’re more receptive to what you have to say. People instinctively distrust a sales pitch. But storytelling leads your reader down a different path — one of new ideas, exciting possibilities and wonderful solutions. So you can skip right over resistance and scepticism to an open-minded, interested audience.

But under every great story must be an even greater strategy!
When copywriting we need to do more than just spin a good yarn. We don’t write to entertain alone. We want that captivated audience to finish reading our copy — then take action. We want them to pick up the phone and call us, race out to buy our product (like I did with my books) or reach into their pockets for a generous donation. Creative copywriting always has a purpose and it is crucial that you don’t lose sight of this just to tell an entertaining tale.

So how do you make storytelling both strategic and scintillating?

Here are some quick tips to make sure your storytelling has a happy ending:

  • Ensure your story is directly relevant and supportive to your purpose.
  • Keep it interesting — boring stories get left on the shelf as will your product if readers fail to engage with your tale.
  • Stick to what’s relevant — beware your story overtaking your point.
  • Make your consumer the hero — show the reader the results they’ll enjoy when they get your product or service. Will they be the envy of their neighbours, make a difference in the world, have a better life?
  • Know your consumer inside out — build your story and their heroism on that knowledge.

Give storytelling a go in your next copywriting project. You’ll be thrilled at the results…and probably rejuvenate your creative juices to boot.

About the author: Naomi Cox is a Word Nerds copywriter who has held marketing and public relations positions in corporations and government departments in Australia and New Zealand.

Michael Gladkoff, the Director of Word Nerds, delivers storytelling keynotes and workshops around Australia. For more information, visit Speech Power.