Father of the Groom Speech Tips

A father of the groom speech is an important milestone in your life. There’s no better feeling in the world than watching your son marry the love of his life.

But how do you, as a proud father, capture such raw emotion?

How do you tell family and friends exactly how you feel?

Here are a few tips on creating entertaining and memorable father of the groom speeches. 

Writing a Father of the Groom Speech

When writing a father of the groom speech, it’s important to set the right tone: light, heartfelt and entertaining.

Although not traditional like a father of the bride speech, father of the groom speeches – along with a bride speech – have become more popular in recent years, and are typically reserved for the rehearsal dinner.

A father of the groom speech can be a great opportunity to highlight the strong bond between you and your son, and to give people a glimpse into his personality.

Here are a few important things to include in a father of the groom speech:

  • Offer a warm welcome to guests, especially those who travelled a long way to attend the big day
  • Acknowledge the bride’s parents and other family members
  • Make special mention of any family members who were unable to attend the wedding day due to travel restrictions or illness
  • Share a funny anecdote or heartwarming story that explains how your son became the man that he is today
  • Welcome your new daughter-in-law into the family
  • Thank everyone involved in the wedding planning, including wedding planners, caterers and entertainment
  • Include any additional thoughts from the mother of the groom, (if she has chosen not to make a speech or if you two are no longer together, with her permission)
  • Offer best wishes to the bride and groom, and raise a glass to the happy couple.

How to Craft the Best Speech to Your Son and His New Bride

A good father of the groom speech comes straight from the heart. But here are some tips to remember when writing a wedding toast:

Keep It Short: The ideal length of a father of the groom speech should be around 3-6 minutes. Any longer, and you might start to lose the crowd.

Don’t Bother Memorising: Wedding speeches, of course, can be incredibly daunting. But you shouldn’t feel under pressure to remember every single word. Print a copy of your speech and practise it a few times so you’re able to make eye contact with the married couple and other guests while speaking.

Keep Thank Yous to a Minimum: It’s impossible to thank everybody in your speech. Instead of listing individual names, thank people in more generalised terms, for example: ‘I’d like to thank the Smith family for all their love and support.’

Good Storytelling: Each story you share about your son should have a purpose – focus on telling stories that are funny or cute, and make sure that they highlight his best qualities. Be playful, but don’t embarrass the young man.

Body Language: Pay attention to your movements as much as your words. Make sure that the mic is close enough so it picks up your voice as it travels with you, but not so close that it smothers your face.

Hire a Professional: Don’t feel confident enough to write your own speech? Get someone else to take down your thoughts so they can mould them into something presentable. A professional writer at Word Nerds can help turn those deep feelings into a speech that your loved ones will never forget!

Funny Wedding Speeches for Father of the Groom

It’s good to inject a little humour into a father of the groom speech. But in a formal environment, it’s important to keep things family-friendly – avoid making any off-colour remarks or telling inappropriate stories. Not only will this reflect badly on yourself and the rest of your family, but you risk creating tension between the bride’s parents and their new son-in-law.

Stick to lighthearted subjects: Talk about your son’s favourite hobbies or interests. Poke gentle fun at the bride and groom, and talk about how they bring out the best in each other. Offer some fatherly words of wisdom or a hilarious quote. And yes, crack a couple of dad jokes (but not too many!)

If you’re not sure about anything, run it by the bride and groom first.

Example Wedding Speeches for Fathers

Although Word Nerds doesn’t offer any templates, there are a number of examples you can use as a guide for writing your own father of the groom speech:

Traditional: ‘Good evening, I’m [your name]. I’m [son’s name]’s father, and I’d like to thank you all for joining us on this special day…’

Brief: ‘Thank you all for coming. To [son’s name], I just want to say that I love you, and seeing you with [bride’s name] makes me so happy. I wish you both a bright and beautiful future together.’

Sentimental: ‘It means so much to me and [groom’s mother] that you’re here to celebrate such a wonderful occasion. I only wish [relative’s name] could also be here with us. [Son’s name], seeing you with [bride’s name] fills me with so much happiness…’

Proud: ‘[Son’s name], as your father, I couldn’t be more proud of you today. I’ve had the unbelievable pleasure of watching you grow…’

Father of the Groom Speeches Australia

Over the years, Word Nerds has written father of the groom speeches for many clients across Australia and can write one for you that’s both touching and memorable.

Over phone or email, one of our writers will you ask a few questions to gather a little background information. You can even send through your own draft or notes for review. We will then begin piecing your speech together, turning your thoughts and feelings into something special.

For more information on writing a father of the groom speech, call Word Nerds today on 1300 731 955 or email us at info@wordnerds.com.au. You can also get in touch via our at the top right-hand side of this page. 

Learn more in our article about the types of wedding speeches.

These include father of the bride speeches, groom speeches and best man speeches.

Funeral Speech Tips

An effective funeral speech (eulogy) tells us about a friend or loved one and honours their life. The little details tell us about a person – things from their life – and how they said and did those things. This applies to a funeral speech for a relative, friend or other loved one.

Although you might have known the person well, it can be challenging to organise and communicate your thoughts when you are called upon to deliver a funeral speech. Here are a few tips for creating a funeral speech to remember and honour the person who has passed away.

Funeral speech for a friend

If you are delivering a funeral speech for a close friend, you can highlight the positive aspects of their personality and how they will be missed. You can achieve this by including examples and stories. These can be funny or touching stories that stand out in your memory. For example:

I first met John 30 years ago on a large construction project in Dandenong when I was the administration manager, and he was a quality engineer. We became housemates in a unit in Oakleigh. Being young, we loved having parties in the unit, going out to cafes and chatting with the waitresses, and playing video games. We also enjoyed comparing whose mum was the better at Greek cooking. We would swap the dishes our mothers prepared for us and rate them. 

A few stories will show the personality of the deceased to the funeral service attendees. In a eulogy for a friend, you will want to use examples that show the positive aspects of their life and personality. It could be how your friend helped others, was a hard worker or had a good sense of humour. 

Funeral speech for mother or father

Whatever your relationship was with your mother or father, a funeral speech for one of your parents can be challenging to write. You can begin by telling a bit about their life in chronological order. This could be a bit about their youth (although you might not know much about it), your first memory of them, and how they helped you grow up. Even if you didn’t have a great relationship with your mum or dad, you can speak about their positive qualities and their positive impact on family and friends. 

If you’re giving a eulogy for your father, here’s an example where the son spoke about his dad’s life. 

My Dad, Robert Johnson, was born in Dover on the 7th of June 1941, 80 years ago. It was a grim period in Dover’s history as the city was extensively bombed throughout World War II. That same year and that same month was also a grim period in British history because British-controlled Singapore fell to the Japanese.

Nevertheless, I’m sure Dad’s arrival into the world at this time was a happy event in an otherwise gloomy part of the world’s history.

His parents Fred and Janet cared for Dad and his sister Ella as best as they could in such dire times during the war and its aftermath.

Once the war was over and the nation moved into a state of reparation, Dad would have grown up observing people around him making do with whatever they had on hand. He would have seen positive examples of innovation, resilience and, importantly, turning any job into a fun job. Just to keep spirits up. This is the environment he grew up in and throughout his life, he constantly displayed the same personal traits. He was a joy to be with.

I’ve heard Dad tell of idyllic childhood stories of playing on the beach, building boats, playing football, boxing and smoking woodbines. Remember, we are talking about the 1950s here.

Dad left school as soon as he could and went to work as a shipwright in Dover.  However, the shipbuilding industry in Dover was declining and almost ceased in the early 1960s. So Dad moved to Shrewsbury with his first wife, Melissa.

This was delivered online from Australia, so it had an international audience.

For a funeral speech for a dad from a daughter, you could do similar things: share stories you remember from experience as well as what you heard about his early life. In general, funeral speeches for mothers and fathers are very similar in style and structure. If you are an older brother or sister, you might have more memories of your parent’s early life than your siblings, but younger members of the family can always ask their surviving parent or another relative about the person’s life. 

Dealing with the fear of public speaking

Whether a eulogy for your dad, your mum, a friend or other loved one, you will probably experience some nervousness about delivering it. Having a written funeral speech is a good idea to build your confidence. It’s okay to read your eulogy, as no one will expect you to deliver it from memory, even if it’s a funeral speech for a friend. It’s a good idea to take some deep breaths before you start. The important part to remember is that people attending are there to hear about contributions and the life of the deceased, and support each other. 

Our funeral speech writing services

Unfortunately, words are all we have when it comes to sharing our thoughts and feelings about a friend or family member. In the midst of all the personal upheaval, it’s hardly your fault if you can’t find the right words. This is where a eulogy writer can help. 

Our specialty is writing funeral speeches and can work with you to remember the person and the story of their life. Every life is cause for celebration and remembrance. We help you honour and remember your friend or relative, whether they had a high-profile life or simply made an impact on close friends and family members. 

 An effective writer knows where to look for these telling details and how to bring them to life on the page. Our funeral speech writing services are designed to fit your needs and include:

  • Creating questions for you to answer to get the background information needed
  • A short follow-up phone conversation if more information is needed
  • Writing the first draft of the funeral speech for you to review
  • Revising the draft based on your feedback to make sure you are satisfied with the final version.

The entire process usually takes two to three days, or quicker if you need to deliver the eulogy sooner.

If you need to write a eulogy and don’t know where to start, contact us by email or give us a call on 1300 731 955. We will be glad to discuss funeral speech examples and provide a quote and timeframe. 

About Michael Gladkoff, Professional Speechwriter and Funeral Speech Writer for Australia

Michael has been writing speeches for over 30 years, starting in his late teenage years when he joined Toastmasters International. He began writing speeches professionally in 2005. Since then, he has written hundreds of speeches for people across Australia. Besides being a funeral speech writer, Michael writes speeches for business and social events.

 

Birthday Speech Tips: How to Write the Perfect Speech

As a professional birthday speechwriter, I have written many milestone birthday speeches, including 21st, 40th, 50th, 80th and more. When it comes to creating an entertaining and memorable speech for a birthday party, you might not be sure how to begin. Here are a few tips for creating a birthday speech, whether it’s for your birthday or that of a colleague, friend or loved one.

Is it for your birthday or someone else’s birthday?

This will make a big difference in how you create this speech. If it’s for yourself, the speech will include thanking people for attending, sharing your memories (successes and challenges), mentioning the impact of your friends and family, and looking to the future. For example, if you are delivering a 50th birthday speech, you will cover important events and people in your life, thank people who have helped you along the way (parents, spouse, other family and friends, etc) and speak about plans for the future. It’s a big day of your life, so you’ll want to think about, plan and write a birthday speech well in advance. 

If a speech is directed at someone else who’s celebrating their birthday, the speech will be a bit different. In this case, it’s to honour that person and help them celebrate. This could include an overview of their life, major achievements and milestones, and best wishes for the future. Everybody loves funny birthday speeches, so it’s always a good idea to include some humour. The best way to do this is to tell funny stories about the person. If it’s a birthday speech for a best friend, it could include funny things that happened to you. 

21st birthday speech

Typically, this is delivered at a 21st birthday party by one of the parents or a close friend. The speaker reflects on the 21 years and offers best wishes for the future. If you are a parent giving a 21st birthday speech, you could mention their birth, what they were like as a baby, key milestones from the childhood and young adult years, and challenges and achievements. The best part of a 21st birthday speech is the opportunity for humour. Think back to all the funny things that happened over the years and include a few of these. Avoid things that might be too embarrassing or you might not speak to your child again. But seriously, a 21st birthday speech is a great time to honour a family member as they enter the next phase of their life. 

Here’s an example of a funny story from a 21st birthday speech for a daughter: 

Tanya has always known exactly what she wants and moves mountains to get it. When she was little, that included mountains of clothes! Sometimes it took us 45 minutes to an hour to get Tanya dressed for kinder in the morning. Her bedroom floor at home may have looked as though a tornado had ripped through it, but Tanya always stepped into kinder in style with a perfectly co-ordinated outfit. 

If you choose to include funny stories, it helps if your audience members have a sense of humour. 

Milestone speech for a best friend or loved one

Whether it’s for a friend’s 40th, 50th, 60th or 70th birthday, you can highlight your relationship with them and how you’ve been through thick and thin together. Speak about the best qualities of your amazing friend and provide a few examples or stories to support this. 

The birthday toast

Whether it’s for your child’s, spouse’s or friend’s birthday, the birthday toast is an essential closing to the speech. Depending on your relationship, it could be a serious or funny birthday toast. Here’s one example from a husband to his wife on her 50th birthday: 

Please join me in a toast to Belinda.

Belinda, I am truly grateful for the wonderful times we have had and I anticipate many more to come. You mean so much to me, our family and our friends. As we grow older and our love grows stronger, I look forward to supporting each other, sharing good times and creating more happy memories together.

Happy Birthday, Belinda!

Get in touch for birthday speech help

If you are stuck and wondering how to write a 50th birthday speech or how to write a speech for a friend’s birthday, we offer birthday speech writing services to create fun and memorable birthday speeches. 

Please contact us on 1300 731 955 or send us an email to discuss your requirements. 

 

Groom Speech: How to Ensure Your Groom Wedding Speech Rocks

Your groom speech is an essential part of your big day. It’s time for you to shine in front of your friends and family and share your thoughts about your beautiful bride. Even if you are not an expert in public speaking or an experienced speechwriter, the following tips will help you create a groom wedding speech that will be admired and remembered. 

Groom speech structure

As a first step, here’s a way to organise your speech. If you are looking for a groom speech template, simply copy and pastes these steps and fill in the spaces with your unique information:

  1. Welcome guests. “On behalf of my wife and me…” Of course, your wife might be speaking also which is more common than it was in the past. 
  2. Mention anyone who has travelled a long way or made a special effort to attend. This might include an elderly relative who made the extra effort to attend despite health issues. 
  3. Thank your best man and the wedding party for their assistance with your wedding plans and help on your special day. Don’t forget to thank others who have helped during the day. It’s also nice to mention the venue and the servers if you think they have done a good job. 
  4. How you got to this point. This can include how you much and major milestones in your relationship, such as how you met, meeting her parents, taking a long trip together, and overcoming challenges together. The father of the bride will cover the bride’s early life, so you don’t need to mention this time in your groom wedding speech.  
  5. Mention your bride’s positive qualities and how you complement each other well. “She’s outgoing, fun, friendly, loyal and considerate. She also is very organised, which will help me overcome some of the chaos I create.” 
  6. Thank your mum and dad and mention the positive influence they had on you. Also mention the bride’s parents and how they raised such a beautiful woman. 
  7. Speak about your bride and how you will spend the rest of your life. “I can honestly say that Luci has made me a better person and I look forward to spending many more happy years with her, continuing our journey and raising a family together.”
  8. Propose a toast to your bride.

Although we don’t provide groom speech examples here, follow these steps to create your own groom wedding speech (or contact us for assistance). 

Groom wedding speech icebreaker

Grooms often ask us if they need a groom speech icebreaker. In general, the groom’s wedding speech is formal but you can include some humour and fun. You don’t necessarily need to do this at the beginning. You can mention any funny stories about things that have happened to you and the best man over the years or humorous stories about meeting and dating your bride. You can always find funny stories to include, but be careful not to embarrass or offend anyone. If you have any doubts about jokes or humour, ask a family member or friend what they think to get another opinion. 

Groom speech ending

The groom wedding speech ending can be the most challenging part. It’s where you show the love and support for your new bride with kind words. You want it to be heartfelt but most men don’t what to be ‘mushy’. Of course, this will depend on your personality and how comfortable you are in expressing your emotions in public. 

Here are two examples of groom speech endings to give you some ideas:

“Theresa, you make me feel deeply loved. Ever since we met I’ve been elated and exhilarated. Thank you for having me as your husband and filling me with joy each day.

“Someone once said, “Well married, a man is winged.”  You have given me wings, and I look forward to a bright and happy future together.

“Now, I would like to bring my speech to end with a toast to my new wife – the love of my life.

“Please be upstanding and raise your glasses –  to Theresa.” 

__________________

“And, of course, I’ve saved the best for last: my radiant new wife Nadia.

“Someone once said: love isn’t a noun, it’s a verb. It isn’t something you get, it’s something you do. It’s how you love your partner every day.

“Well, Nadia, I plan on making every day of our lives together better than the day before. Over the last three years, I’ve already fallen in love with you a million times over. You bring order to my chaos, beauty to my world and on top of all that you cook a mean Italian cuisine, one of the true keys to my heart.

“We’ve already been to Japan, Hong Kong, Europe and beyond together. I look forward to sharing many more adventures in the future

“I can’t wait to spend the rest of my life with you.

“Everyone, please join me in toasting my bride: To Nadia.” 

The wedding toast is usually the last thing mentioned, as found in these examples.

Getting help to create a great groom speech

Contact us on 1300 731 955 or email to get assistance with your groom speech. We’ll be glad to discuss wedding day speech requirements. 

Also, here’s some general information on wedding speeches and best man speech tips. 

Father of the Bride Speech: Tips to Make it Memorable

Your daughter’s wedding is a big milestone that will be cherished by many. Out of the various wedding speeches, the father of the bride speech can be the most touching and memorable for all. Getting your speech right will help set the tone for the reception and the experience of friends and family. Here are a few ideas to get ready for the big day.

What to include in a father of the bride speech?

Out of wedding speeches, the father of the bride speech is an opportunity to highlight the bride’s history and personality. A few things to include in a simple father of the bride speech are:

  • Welcoming guests and making special mention of those who have travelled a long distance
  • Acknowledging the bride’s parents and family members in attendance
  • Mentioning any family members who couldn’t attend due to illness or travel restrictions
  • Telling stories about the development of your daughter and how she became the woman she is today
  • Welcoming your son-in-law into your family and sharing positive thoughts about him (you don’t need to say too much as this will be covered in the best man speech)
  • Thanking people who have helped you with the wedding day, including wedding suppliers, such as caterers and entertainers
  • Include any thoughts from your wife (if she’s not speaking) or the bride’s mother (if you are no longer together and she agrees to this)
  • Offer them best wishes for the future and propose a toast to the bride and groom. 

While we don’t include a father of the bride speech template here, including the points above should be enough to create a memorable father of the bride speech. 

Creating a funny speech

As mentioned, humour can be included in your speech. It can be a way to break the ice at the beginning. However, it’s best to avoid telling a standard joke. Instead, tell funny stories about your daughter. It could be funny things she did or said as a child and humorous experiences from the teenage and young adult years.  Humour can also be added by giving some ‘marriage advice’ to the groom based on your daughter’s personality. For example. “Just let her choose what you’re going to watch on Netflix and you’ll be fine.” 

When using humour in a father of the bride speech remember to avoid being offensive or embarrassing anyone, especially your daughter. This could set a sour tone for the wedding. If you are going to use a joke that you’re not sure about, run it by the bride and groom beforehand to make sure they approve. After all, it’s their day and they should have some input into what’s said. 

father of the bride speech examples

Speech toast

This is at the end of the father of the bride speech where you share your final thoughts and offer best wishes to the happy couple. Ask guests to raise their glasses for the toast. Sometimes people will stand, but this will depend on the wedding venue (it might be too cramped for people to get up and down out of their seats for numerous toasts by the speakers). Also, you will also want to make sure that the servers understand that you will be proposing a toast and that beverages need to be available for this. 

Father of the bride speech examples

Although we don’t provide father of the bride speech examples here, here’s an outline of one of the speeches we wrote: 

  1. Thanking guests for attending
  2. Speaking about your daughter: early years, personality, funny stories
  3. First impressions of the groom and his positive aspects
  4. How the bride and groom complement each other: the things they have in common and how they can compensate for each other through their differences
  5. Best wishes for the future
  6. Propose a toast to the bride and groom. 

Father of the bride speech Australia

Over the years, we have written many wedding speeches for celebrations across Australia. Feel free to get in touch with us on 1300 731 955 or email to discuss your father of the bride speech requirements. 

Best Man Speech — Tips for a Memorable Speech

A best man speech can be one of the best wedding speeches on the big day and help guests have a great time if you plan it right. If you’re the best man at a wedding, your speech is your chance to shine. If you’re not sure how to write a best man speech, here are a few tips to create a great best man speech that wedding guests will admire. If you’re wondering “How to write my best man speech?”, the tips covered below can serve as a best man speech template to help you organise your information.

For the best man speech, don’t introduce yourself

First, you probably won’t need to introduce yourself at the beginning, as this is usually done by the master of ceremonies. What you will want to do is write a short introduction for the MC or discuss your background with him or her. Don’t give away too much though — save the good stuff for yourself. If you are introduced, you won’t need to say something like, “Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. My name is _______. I’m the best man and I will be delivering a speech today”, as the guests will already know this.  

Welcome and thank people

As an opening line, you can welcome guests and thank anyone who has helped with the special day. It’s also customary to thank people who have travelled a long way to participate in the wedding day. People who have travelled a long distance across Australia or from overseas will appreciate the gesture. It will also help break the ice between guests during the reception as they get to know each other. 

At some point during the speech, you will want to thank those who have helped you. I usually include this at the beginning after welcoming people, as this leaves the rest of the speech open to talk about the groom and bride, and their future together. Say your ‘Thank yous’ to the groomsmen and any other good friends who helped out. Sometimes you will also want to thank the bridesmaids if they have assisted you in your role as best man.

Once you have the formalities out of the way, it’s time to start talking about the groom in your best man speech. Things to talk about can include when you met and what you have done together over the years. If you have known the groom from an early age, you will have plenty of material to draw from. You can include stories about sports, school and university, travel and other activities when writing a best man speech.

Tips for funny best man speeches

The fun comes in when you start talking about the funny and dumb things the groom has done over the years. These stories will make your speech enjoyable and memorable. When including these stories be sure they are appropriate for all audience members. If something is too embarrassing or won’t be appropriate for all guests, it’s probably best to leave it out.

In one speech I wrote, the best man wanted to include some ‘raunchy’ material that some might find embarrassing. To be sure, I double-checked with him and he insisted that this material remained in his speech. After the event, I asked him how it went. He said that the audience loved it. So it always depends on who is attending the wedding. 

Best man speech jokes can be easily found online. It’s a matter of finding the right one that connects to the best man. In one case, the groom was an accountant and I included this for the best man:  “Since he’s an accountant, he should make a good lover — because he’s great with figures.” 

In one speech for the brother of the best man, I wrote a short section where the best man teased his brother (the groom) in a lighthearted way. It went like this:

Carlo is older, but I am the best man.

Carlo is a good swimmer, but I am the best man.

Carlo has more muscles, but I am the best man.

Carlo thinks he is smarter, but I am the best man.

Carlo is better at fishing and hunting, but I am the best man.

Carlo is good at jujitsu, but I am still the best man.

And not only all of that – I am two inches taller than he is!

In another example, the younger brother was the best man and complained that the groom always cheated and tricked him when they played rock, paper, scissors. 

In the end, the type of humour you use will depend on the audience. If you feel some of the guests don’t have a sense of humour, include it anyway to lighten up the speech and wedding reception. It doesn’t have to be a completely funny presentation but you should include some humour. In the end, funny best man speeches will be remembered for years to come. 

Highlight the positive

The next part of creating the perfect best man speech is when you talk about the positive qualities of the groom, including what a great friend he is. Looking back on your friendship, think about the groom’s best traits. These could be things like hard-working, determined, reliable, trustworthy and entertaining. Choose a few of these and give examples of why he is such a great friend.

If you know the bride well enough, you can speak about her positive qualities as well. This is usually done by the father of the bride, so you don’t need to go into specific detail, as he will provide insights into the life and character of his daughter. 

Following this, talk about how the bride and groom complement each other. These might be opposite personality traits that help to balance them as a couple and things they have in common, such as they both love footy, rugby, camping, going to the gym, etc.

Send them off with best wishes and a toast at the end 

At the end of your speech, you can talk about the future. Paint a positive picture of positive things to come, whether it’s travel, career, family or a new home. Don’t forget that it’s an emotional day, so it’s okay to be a bit inspirational as you talk about the couple’s future together. 

The final words should be your best man toast to the happy couple. Before making raising a glass for the toast, ask the guests to fill their glasses and stand up.

Best man speech template

Although I don’t offer a best man speech template, here’s an outline of what is typically covered in the speech and the order it’s presented:

  1. Welcome guests and highlight any who have travelled a long way to attend.
  2. Thank anyone who helped you as the best man.
  3. Discuss your history with the groom — how long you have known each other, memorable and funny stories and things you have done together.
  4. Talk about the groom’s most positive qualities — this could be his focus on work, helping others, staying fit, persistence.
  5. Mention how the bride and groom complement each other — this could be things they have in common and how their differences balance each other out.
  6. Speak about their future together and any goals they have shared with you. This could be buying a house, starting a family or travelling the world together.
  7. Toast the happy couple.

If you fill in the details for these seven points, you have everything needed for a best man speech template.

We have written many best man speeches over the years and will be glad to discuss your specific requirements if you’re wondering “How to write my best man speech?” Please contact us on 1300 731 955 or use the contact form above for a no-obligation discussion.

If you’re interested, we can provide a quote and timeframe for writing your complete speech. 

For more information and wedding speeches in general, check out our wedding speeches page.

best man speech

Best man speech example

Here’s a best man speech example we created for the groom’s brother. Although not a best man speech template, it will give you an idea of how this type of speech is put together if you decide to write your own.

Thank you for being here as we celebrate the wedding of Rick and Tina.

For those who may not know me, my name is Jeff Hardy, and I have the honour of being my brother’s best man at his wedding.  Thank you, Rick and Tina.  I feel very privileged.

Before I get on to the toast to the bride and groom, I’m going to share a few things I have learnt about Rick during the past 27 years.

Rick has always been very sports orientated and a great athlete. While I had to work hard, it just came naturally to him – whether it was cricket, football or tennis. I remember him being the man of the match in football and being coached and excelling in tennis.

Along with sports, Rick has always been very competitive, which can be a plus or a minus, depending on how you look at it. Once when we were pretty young, I got lucky and bowled him out in a game of cricket. He was very surprised and got angry. Then he threw the bat at me and broke my nose — and he’s three years younger than me.

Another time he was playing in a high-pressure tennis match, and things weren’t going his way. He then had a John McEnroe moment and started hitting balls over the fence.

I’m glad to say that Rick has calmed down over the years and isn’t as temperamental.

We have always done things together, including buying our toys while trying to outdo each other. I remember when I bought a 30-foot boat. Rick had to get one too, so we could both go out in our big boats during the summer holidays. We are part owners of a racehorse together. I own 25% and Rick owns 2.5%.  But when our horse wins, Rick says that his 2.5% is the nose that made it over the finish line first.

Despite his competitive streak and breaking my nose all those years ago, we’re still best mates and look out for each other. We also were protective of our younger sister Bec when we were growing up. Guys were afraid to go out with Bec when Rick and were I around, which wasn’t suitable for her social life. But now that we’ve grown up and moved on, that’s changed.

Rick and I had many great times together. One experience that stands out was travelling to China on our last family holiday together. We went out to a bar in the nightclub district in Shanghai and couldn’t believe all the women around trying to get our attention. We thought it was cool to be so popular — until we realised they were practising the world’s oldest profession. So we get out of there and went to a nightclub. Somehow we ended up on stage singing and had everyone singing along with us. In the end, the crowd was cheering ‘Aussie, Aussie, Aussie’ as we left.

Getting back to today, I am happy that Rick has met a woman as wonderful as Tina. They are both fit, attractive and glamorous blonde beach beauties. Sometimes I like to joke that they are the Brad and Angelina of our district.

But seriously, I feel Rick and Tina are a perfect match. While Rick can get agitated sometimes, Tina is mellow and laid back and is a calming influence. So they complement and balance each other perfectly, and I feel privileged to have Tina as my sister-in-law.

Please join me for the toast to the bride and groom.

Rick and Tina, I congratulate you as you open in a new chapter in your lives.

May your life be full of love, opportunity and happiness.

May you live each day like it’s your last, and live each night like it’s your first.

To Rick and Tina!

If you are not a great public speaker, having an effective speech prepared will help you make an impression on the big day. Weddings can be a lot of fun if you’re ready for them. So relax, prepare and enjoy some wedding cake at the end.

 

 

 

Eulogy Writing Tips: How to Write a Eulogy

Writing a eulogy and then delivering it is an important part of any funeral. It’s a way to remember a friend or family member and celebrate their life. If you are wondering how to write a eulogy, here are a few tips.  

Writing the eulogy

A eulogy will look back at the deceased person’s life, positive aspects of their personality and the impact they had on others.

You might not have all the information you need. For example, if you are a son or daughter of the person, writing a eulogy for mother or eulogy for father, you won’t know everything about the early years.  In this case, you might have to ask family and friends about their earlier years in the life of the deceased person.

The word ‘eulogy’ comes from the Greek word for ‘praise’. In fact, in the past, the word was used more broadly to define other speeches, such as a retirement speech. So keep in mind that your speech should focus on the positive aspects of the person’s life and personality when eulogy writing.

How to write a eulogy

Some of the aspects to think about are interesting or touching events or stories about:

  • Birth and early years
  • Parents and siblings 
  • Schools years – academic, sports and other achievements
  • Young adulthood
  • Marriage and family
  • Career
  • Hobbies and interests
  • Favourite music and sports
  • Difficult times in life and how they overcame them
  • Beliefs and causes
  • Impact on others – how they changed the world for the better.

A large part of a meaningful funeral speech will include sharing stories from the person’s life. If it’s a eulogy for your mother, you would talk about you mother’s life and important things your mother taught you. If it’s for your father, you could talk about what your father loved to do. You might include insight from a close friend who he grew up with or worked with.

Length of the eulogy

There’s no rule for how long your speech should be. You will want to share the most interesting and important aspects of the person’s life and personality. It could be as short as five minutes or as long as 10 minutes. As a general rule, you probably don’t want to go over ten minutes. 

A good rate for delivering this speech is around 125 words per minute. So, for example,  if you want to speak for six minutes, you will want around 750 words when eulogy writing.

Writing and delivering a eulogy

When you are happy with what you have written, it’s time to work on delivery. This can seem daunting if you are not experienced in public speaking. Given the timeframe and circumstances, people won’t expect to remember your speech, so it’s okay to read the eulogy. At the same time, you will want to look up from the page and make eye contact with the audience. While you won’t need to memorise the speech, you will want to read it several times to become familiar with it. If you can, practise it at home by reading it out loud to yourself. You might also discover some spots that are not clear or are hard to deliver. In this case, you will want to do some editing.

Stage fright is another consideration. But the more prepared you are, the more confident you will be. If you feel nervous before your turn to speak, do some deep breathing to relax. While delivering the speech, speak slowly. If you are nervous, you will tend to speed up your speaking rate, so focusing on speaking slowly will help you stay in control.

Additional tips for writing a eulogy for specific people

Eulogy for father: For a son or daughter, you can share your memories of your father. This could include special memories in the form of stories about what your father meant to you and how he made a positive impact on your life.  A short eulogy for a father can focus on the happy memories, the impact of your father and how he will be missed. 

Eulogy for mother: This will be similar when writing a eulogy about your father. Include a few stories that highlight the important impact of your mother and what she meant to you. If you’re wondering how to write a good eulogy for your mother, again, reflect on your mother’s life and her positive impact. Use a few stories and examples to highlight these aspects. 

Eulogy for grandmother or eulogy for grandfather: Again, share special memories of your grandmother of grandfather. You can also speak to your older relatives to gain insights into their earlier lives. 

Eulogy for a friend: When writing a eulogy for a friend, you can include how you met the person and how your friendship developed over the years. Recall some of the things you did together, such as sports, travel and recreation. If you can think of any funny stories that are in good taste, include these in a eulogy for a friend as well. 

Remember that the idea of a eulogy is to paint a positive picture of the person and their life. If you point out any shortcomings (which we all have), this should be done in a humorous or forgiving way.

Eulogy writing services

If you feel stuck on how to write a funeral speech, we’ll be glad to help. As professional speechwriters, we have helped thousands of people over the years with their eulogy writing needs. 

The process of eulogy writing includes:

  • Providing a list of questions to answer to get the background material required
  • Following up with a short phone discussion if more information is needed
  • Creating the first draft of the speech for review
  • Making changes to the draft based on your feedback.

The entire eulogy writing process usually takes two to three days, or faster if you need to deliver the eulogy sooner.  Contact me using the form on this page or call me on 1300 731 955 to discuss the process and the fee for writing a eulogy.

About Michael Gladkoff, Speechwriter

Michael has been writing speeches for over 30 years. He started during his teens when he joined Toastmasters. He began writing speeches professionally in 2005. Since then, he has written hundreds of speeches. Besides being a eulogy writer, Michael writes speeches for business leaders and special events. 

How to Write a Christmas Party Speech to Remember

Writing a Christmas party speech can be daunting, especially when you know it is going to be delivered before work colleagues and peers. However, writing an air-tight speech will go a long way to quelling those nerves. So here are the basics for writing a great Christmas party speech, from A-Z.

Christmas table setting for a Christmas party speech.

Writing the Beginning of Christmas Party Speech

A Christmas party speech must do two things as quickly as possible: the first is to get the listeners’ attention, the second is to present the question or theme which will expanded upon in the body of the speech. Traditionally, a Christmas party speech will begin by welcoming the guests, thanking them for coming, and perhaps acknowledging those who made a special effort to be there. By contrast, the modern approach is to postpone these formalities until later in the speech, to grab the listener’s attention immediately. A speech of this kind will begin with a story of sorts. For example, ‘The end of the year looked a long way away back in August. When the big project landed on our desks, I know several of you were very sick with the flu, and poor Joan was taken to hospital.’

To be clear, there is nothing wrong with doing the greetings and acknowledgements first, but neither is it wrong to leave it until later in the speech. But if you do choose to go with option A, keep it short and sweet. Then launch straight into your story.

The Body of a Christmas Party Speech

This is the bulk of a Christmas party speech, which will include all the highlights and low-points of the year, as well as the lighter moments. Again, these anecdotes will ultimately be seen through the lens of whatever themes you have established at the beginning. Perhaps Joan came back to work a few days later than they had been told, and found only one slice of her “Welcome Back” cake in the refrigerator. As a result, the moral of the story established at the start might be that ‘laughing and caring about one another is what gets us through the hard times.’ From this premise, you would have carte blanche to launch into every funny story and act of kindness that year. On the subject of humour, a quick reminder to take care that your laughs are good natured and won’t embarrass or offend. This is not an open-mic comedy spot; these people know one another and must work together.

At some point in the body of the Christmas party speech, you will need to talk about the challenges and regrets of the year. Talk about those that have retired. Perhaps someone died. If so, be sure to honour their memory. Those closest to them will greatly appreciate that you remembered them.

Ending a Christmas Party Speech

 The end of a Christmas party speech is the perfect time to thank everybody for coming along, and to highlight your message (in my example with Ruth, laughter and caring). If your opening story was not of a personal nature, you might want to end with a recollection of Christmas – from your childhood, or how special it is to spend it with your children. A Christmas party speech, after all, is an opportunity to bring people closer together, in laughter and gratitude. Beyond being staff members, we’re all human.

Getting help with your Christmas speech

If you need assistance with your Christmas speech, get in touch on 1300 731 955 or email us.

Also, check out our Speechwriting Services page.